Life, Autism, Disability, and More

Category Archives: good day

World's Best Mother StatueAt the thrift store, I spotted it.

One of those little statuettes from the 1970s. I remember having them in the house when I was a kid, up on the shelves with knickknacks and tchotchkes.

But this one. This one was for me:
World’s Best Mother.

I brought it up to the register to buy it, and the woman in line behind me saw it. Well, part of it.

“What does that say?” She asked.

“World’s Best Mother.” I picked it up off the counter and showed it to her.

And I bought it.

For myself.

 

I don’t know about your house, but in our house, summer is rough. Simon *loves* school.

He loves the people. He loves the routine. He loves the activities.

Starting yesterday (Memorial Day), he began to focus on ESY (Extended School Year for y’all not in the know…it’s like summer school, but for kids with special needs who need extra help over the summer).

He spent the whole Monday talking about ESY, asking about it, telling us when it was.

Unfortunately, ESY is only four weeks long. Two weeks in June. Two weeks in July. Four days each of those weeks. Three hours each of those days.

Math.
4 x 4 x 3 = 36 hours.

Over nine weeks.

I’m going into the summer prepared and hopeful.

The World’s Best Mother award is part of those preparations.

Like most mothers – especially those of us mothers with special needs kids – there are more days when we feel like the worst mothers instead of the best mothers.

But we shouldn’t.

Even on those worst mother days, we’re still pretty good. As long as our kids are still alive, we’re still alive, and no one is going to jail, it’s a good day.

We’re the World’s Best Mothers.

Download Me:
Worlds Best Mother Award

 


simon on a couch

This has nothing to do with this blog. We just went and sat on furniture because he likes to, and I took this picture and liked it.

In under a month, Simon turns 15.

Horrifying, isn’t it?

He will be firmly in teenage-hood, and, come the fall, he’ll be in high school.

I meant terrifying, not horrifying.

But that’s the scary news. Now for the awesome news:

Simon explained why he was stimming and how he was feeling.

For those who don’t know what stimming is, or why you should not stop a person from doing it, here’s a quick explanation. Stimming (self-stimulating behavior) is what a number of people on the spectrum do. It’s what a lot of people might call “hand flapping,“ or it can be any number of other behaviors that help the person to calm themselves or express themselves. You shouldn’t stop it because, well, it’s a person calming themselves or expressing themselves. (Go read this now. And be prepared to cry.)

Back to the story…

We went out to Logan’s Steakhouse. They serve grilled cheese, a veggie plate, and steaks, so they meet all our requirements for going out. They even have free peanuts.

We were waiting for our meals to come out, and Simon was stimming. He was sitting in the corner of the booth, flapping his hands, and moving his head. And smiling.

“Why are you doing that?” I asked him, not actually expecting an answer, but asking because I always try anyway.

“I’m happy,” he said.

Wait. What? He said he was happy?

“Why are you happy?” I asked, pushing my luck.

He didn’t say anything for a minute. Just kept flapping and smiling.

“I like Logan’s,” he said.

Wow.

First off, I can know with some degree of certainty that he does actually know why he stims, and he’s doing it on purpose. Second, I know that he really does like going out to eat there. I was pretty sure of that second thing already since he asks to go whenever we go buy our comics – I have no idea why he has put that connection there, but he has, and it’s awful hard to say no when you’re tired and don’t feel like cooking.

So, the next time you think about telling a person who stims to stop it or to have “quiet hands,” shut up instead.


simon at goodwillOkay, maybe it’s not a true sickness. But it’s one that I caught in my childhood, Patrick caught in his childhood, too. Now it’s Simon’s turn.

The sickness?

Book addiction.

I’ve been waiting for this day. I’ve been hoping for this day. I’ve been praying for this day.

And it’s finally come.

Simon has had favorite books before. Every night, he wants to read Goodnight, Moon. By now, everyone has that memorized. (In the great green room…)

We’ve been going to the library at least once a week, and he loves it, but he always tended to get the same books over and over. Board book, specifically. Simple ones, intended for toddlers.

I was fine with that. At least he had an interest in books. But there wasn’t much to them. A word or two a page with a picture.

Then it was summer, and we were bored. We started to go to thrift stores on a semi-regular basis.

He began getting books there. $1.00 here. $.50 there. His collection began to grow.

And then…

And then…we went to a thrift store, and he began getting cranky with me. I asked him what he wanted – normally that’s answered with the response of “a big hug!” – but that time he said, “books.”

We went over to the kid’s book area.

I searched the shelves, but I couldn’t find anything that he wanted. Then he reached in, almost randomly it seemed, and he pulled out an “Early Reader” Blue’s Clues book.

What.

The…

I had totally missed it, but he found it. I guess we don’t need to worry about him getting glasses anytime soon.

The minute he pulled it out, he opened it and began reading it. He read it all the way through. When I asked him if he wanted it, he said, “Yes.” Another irregular response – most of the time, he says “no” when asked if he wants things.

We went and bought it, and as soon as we got into the car, he said, “You can have your book when we get home.”

“Do you want it now?”

“Yes.”

I passed it into the backseat, and he immediately began reading it again.

The torch has been passed. We have a reader on our hands.


ESY has started back up, but in the two weeks Simon had off, we did lots of fun things. One of those was to hit the Galleria up in Houston.

Now, before anyone thinks I’m a cruel mom who forces her poor child to go shopping, please realize that he ASKED for the Galleria. I tried to talk him out of it. I offered all sorts of other options. No dice. He wanted to go shopping.

Not that he actually shops, mind you. Nope, he much prefers wandering around, staring at things, stopping to eat a cookie, and, in the case of the Galleria, checking out their awesome two-story fountain.

We were wandering around because I am one of those people that always gets lost in a mall. And there it was! Simon was super excited, and I told him to go ahead and sit on the edge because the ledge is pretty wide, and if you’re right there, you can feel the spray of the water as it hits down, and you get a cool breeze from it rushing past you. It feels awesome in the dog days of July.

What you don’t see in the picture below is that the fountain had stopped. It goes through its cycle, and then it pauses. I guess that’s when the water is all feeding back for it to run again.

Simon was waiting patiently on the edge, when – SLAM – it started back up!

He jumped. Almost fell over backwards jumped. Then he got a huge smile and settled back to watch it.

So as the Daily Show always said at the end…here it is…your moment of Zen…

 

simon at fountain


quiet loudYesterday was a day of rock star parenting.

It started with one of the best parts of summer vacation – sleeping in. Not that Simon slept in, mind you. But he let me sleep in! He ignored me for a good hour or two, not even needing me to get him a drink or any food. It was glorious.

Then we went to the library. He picked out a new book: Quiet Loud by Leslie Patricelli. The book is full of things that are, well, quiet and loud. Then, on the last two pages, there are pictures of all different things that are quiet and loud. He had the book open to those pages, and so I went ahead and tried to quiz him on them, asking him about items that were in front of him. Then I made it harder. I asked him about things that weren’t on the pages: a rocking chair and a phone. He quickly told me that rocking chairs were quiet, and then when I asked him about the phone, he made the ringing noises before telling me they were loud. Score! Total communication and connection!

As we were leaving, though, he started getting upset: unhappy flapping, echolalia about why babies cry (from Elmo), and rocking back and forth in a jerky movement. I asked him why he was upset, and he said he was sad. I asked why he was sad, and he said he was crying. This is our usual exchange; he struggles with talking about why he’s upset or sad, resorting to using a circular pattern of questions and answers. After going through this for a few minutes, he said he wanted cookies. A response! And then I pulled out my rock star parenting moment. I HAD COOKIES WITH ME! Totally nailed it! Amazing!

After that, we headed to Target. Because shopping. He kept repeating a phrase, but I couldn’t understand the first word. Every time he said it, I asked him to repeat it, hoping I would finally figure it out. Finally, I asked him to spell it. And he did. R-O-T-T-E-N. I said it back to him, and after that, he repeated it, saying it more clearly each time. I still have no idea what show he got the phrase from, but still.

Three successes in one day! Total rock start parenting day!

As for today…well, let’s not talk about today.

 


Image by njaj via freedigitalphotos.net

Image by njaj via freedigitalphotos.net

Nothing exciting happened. But one quick thing worth mentioning.

It was raining today. Off and on, but enough to bring out lots of birds.

Which is one of the times when we’re happy that Simon’s pediatrician gave us a handicapped tag oh so many years ago. Because when the birds are out, Simon kind of gets freaked out.

I’m not sure what it is about the birds that bother him: the way they move? The noises they make? I mean, I’m not wild about birds, either, but to him, they are totally freaky. He jumps, he runs, he tries to get away from them. So using the handicapped tag works great on days when we have to go somewhere (like the grocery store) because then we can park close to the store. Trying to navigate him through a large parking lot is probably not the safest thing in the world for him. Or for us.

So not a big deal. Everything ran smoothly. And Simon went to bed happy.

Let’s see if there’s a ball game tomorrow or if the rain continues…