Life, Autism, Disability, and More

Tag Archives: sports

baseball uniform*I might be the only one who remembers hearing this when growing up, so a quick explanation:
Little pitchers have big ears refers to the fact that adults must be careful about what they say within the hearing of children. The saying refers to the large handles (ears) sometimes attached to small vessels.

Now that I’ve forced that random knowledge on you…

Lately, I’ve been trying more and more to get Simon interested in average discussions and conversations. He doesn’t seem to be very interested in communicating more than his needs and wants, but I can’t help but believe that there are plenty of other things he could say if he could figure out how. When we go places in the car, and he’s stuck as my captive audience, I start trying to get him to have a conversation. I’ll ask what color the sky is, and if it’s grey, then I’ll ask him what he thinks that means. Questions like that are easy ones for him to memorize, though, so then I start asking harder questions, questions about what he thinks about and what he sees out the window.

One Saturday morning, he had a baseball game, and that afternoon, I took him to Target.  While we were in the car, I asked him what he was good at.

He said baseball.

I asked what else.

He said math.

I asked what else.

He said basketball.

It was a pretty nice list of things for such an abstract question.  

We went into Target and Starbucks (it’s an addiction! Don’t judge me!), and I told him he was good because he helped push the cart and waited patiently while it took forever for the barista to make my coffee.

When we got home, I thought I’d try to continue the conversation and pull Dad into it.

I asked the question again, and this time he began with baseball, but then said he was good at Logan’s (the restaurant where we ate lunch after the game and where we told him he did good at ordering his own food and then waiting for it to come to the table), and then he said he was also good at Target and Starbucks.

After he had added those in, he went back to the original list including math and basketball.

The point had been made.

Just because he’s a teenager who doesn’t say a lot, he definitely listens and learns. And he has huge ears. 

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Yes, he hit the ball!

Yes, he hit the ball!

First off, for those in the Houston area who are reading this, I highly recommend you register for the Family to Family Network Conference and Resource Fair.  They have two this year – both of them just under a full day long.  The first one is Saturday, March 22, and it lasts from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

I had registered for it.  There are some awesome-sounding panels.  I was going to “The Future is Sooner Than You Think” and “Working out Conflicts” and “My Kid in One Page or Less.”  All of that sounds really, really good, right?  I’m sure it would have been.  But it turns out I won’t be going.

Why not?

Because on the first of March, Simon started the Hometown Heroes Challenger League.  It’s the Little League Baseball team meant for children with disabilities.  They have volunteer boys from the Little League who come and work one-on-one with the kids on the Challenger League, and the Challenger League gives the kids who wouldn’t normally get to play Little League a chance to, well, play Little League.

Going out to the field...

Going out to the field…

I missed the first game.  I had planned, before I knew the game schedule, a trip for business to Seattle.  I couldn’t cancel it, and it would be okay; my husband was taking Simon, and they would have a great time.  (They did.)

But I missed it.

I wasn’t there for it, and while I got a wealth of pictures and even a few videos, I wasn’t there for it.

So I look at it this way – I can go and learn about my child in an abstract way.  I can figure out future plans that may or may not happen. I can hear about conflict resolution.  And I can condense everything about him into a single page to help others learn about him.

Or I can go and actually be with him.  I can watch him play.  I can help him.  I can cheer him on.  I can see what he does.

I don’t think there’s really much of a choice at all there, is there?